Gibbes: New Exhibit and Virtual Lectures in October

The Gibbes Museum of Art is pleased to announce its newest special exhibition, Charleston Collects: Devotion and Fantasy, Witchcraft and the World’s End. This selection of paintings and prints from a major, private, Charleston collection of Northern Renaissance art introduces a world of intensely, and sometimes disturbingly, vivid imagery that speaks to uncertainties of the period and remains relevant today. This exhibit will be on display from October 9, 2020—June 27, 2021.

To coincide with the opening of Charleston Collects: Devotion and Fantasy, Witchcraft and the World’s End, the Gibbes will host related virtual programming, including:

An introduction to the masterpieces featured in the exhibition Charleston Collects: Devotion and Fantasy, Witchcraft and the World’s End, the virtual lecture will be led by professor of art history, University of Virginia, Dr. Lawrence Geodde. This virtual lecture is $20 for members and $30 for non-members. Click here for tickets. The private Zoom link will be circulated one day before the event. This virtual program is made possible by the generous support of Art Bridges.

  • Virtual Curator-Led Tour: Charleston Collects with Sara Arnold — October 15, 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Viewers can explore the exhibition Charleston Collects: Devotion and Fantasy, Witchcraft and the World’s End with Gibbes Museum curator, Sara Arnold. This tour offers unique insight into the collection and will be streamed through Facebook Live @theGibbesMuseum. It is free and open to the public.

For more information about these programs, visit www.gibbesmuseum.org.

-Submitted by The Gibbes Museum

This exhibition is a selection of art curated by Lawrence Goedde, Ph.D., professor of art history at the University of Virginia. The collection, which is comprised of objects created in the Low Countries and Germany between 1440 and 1590, showcases a world of contradictions and unease—whether the subject is a troubled Virgin Mary contemplating her young son, or a menacing group of malevolent figures inspired by Hieronymus Bosch, or Albrecht Dürer’s famous scenes from Revelations. In the turbulent era of the Renaissance and beginning of the Reformation in Northern Europe, patrons found their hopes, desires and anxieties mirrored in these artistic images, further inspiring pious beliefs or depicting fantastic visions of good and evil.

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