Seabrookers Are Reading…

When reflecting on reading, author Stephen King once said “Books are a uniquely portable magic.” Why do you read? To escape to a different time and place? To experience someone else’s imagination? To acquire knowledge? To know that you are not alone? To appreciate the craft of writing? To share ideas with others? To be inspired? To relax? Whatever your reason for reading, we hope that you will continue to share your recommendations with our readers.

Klara and the Sun
by Kazuo Ishiguro
From her place in the store that sells artificial friends, Klara–an artificial friend with outstanding observational qualities–watches carefully the behavior of those who come in to browse, and of those who pass in the street outside. She remains hopeful a customer will soon choose her, but when the possibility emerges that her circumstances may change forever, Klara is warned not to invest too much in the promises of humans. (2021, 303 pgs; Fiction)

The Women of Chateau Lafayette
by Stephanie Dray
This epic generational saga from New York Times bestselling author Stephanie Dray is based on the true story of an extraordinary castle in the heart of France and the remarkable women bound by its legacy in some of humanity’s darkest hours. (2021, 376 pgs; Fiction)

Keep Sharp
by Sanjay Gupta
Neurosurgeon Dr. Sanjay Gupta offers insights from top scientists all over the world whose cutting-edge research can help you heighten and protect brain function and maintain cognitive health at any age. (2021, 318 pgs; Nonfiction)

Much Abides
by Charles H. Edwards, II
A survival guide for aging lives. If valued and approached creatively, this late phase has the potential to provide the most satisfaction and joy for the longest period of time. (2020, 129 pgs; Nonfiction)

The Four Winds
by Kristin Hannah
From the author of The Nightingale and The Great Alone, comes an epic novel of love and heroism and hope, set against the backdrop of one of America’s most defining eras-the Great Depression. Texas, 1934. (2021, 454 pgs; Fiction)

Anxious People
by Fredrik Bachman
Taken hostage by a failed bank robber while attending an open house, eight anxiety-prone strangers–including a redemption-seeking bank director, two couples who would fix their marriages, and a plucky octogenarian–discover their unexpected common traits. (2020, 341 pgs; Fiction)

The Nickel Boys
by Colson Whitehead
In this bravura follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize, and National Book Award-winning The Underground Railroad, Whitehead brilliantly dramatizes another strand of American history through the story of two boys sentenced to a hellish reform school in Jim Crow-era Florida. (2019, 213 pgs; Fiction)

We look forward to hearing about the books you or your book club recommend.

  • Include your name (although it will not be published), the title, and author of the book you are recommending and email this to Tidelines at seabrookislandblog@gmail.com. (You may be able to click on the email address to open a new message.)
  • For audiobooks, include the name of the narrator.
  • Tidelines editors will provide a blurb to tell a little about the book and add the book jacket image.
  • Publication is at the discretion of Tidelines editors.

Tidelines Editors

(Image and bibliographic credit: CMPL)

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