August at The Gibbes Museum

The Gibbes Museum of Art has some exciting events happening in August along with three ongoing major special exhibitions. See below for more information. 

Programming

Conserving Johnson’s Freedom Fighters, August 2, 2022, 6:00 – 7:00 pm
Keara Teeter, Lunder Fellow in Paintings Conservation at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, was instrumental in treating and preparing William H. Johnson’s Fighters for Freedom to travel. In this virtual presentation from the Lunder Conservation Center, Teeter will share examples and treatment case studies of these monumental figures that museum visitors have come to love over the spring in the exhibition Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice. To register for this virtual event, ciick here.
Price: Members: $10 | Non-members: $15 | Students and Faculty: $5

Other events

Art of Jazz: Jamie Slater Trio, August 24, 2022, 6:00 – 7:00 pm
In collaboration with Charleston Jazz, the Gibbes presents this jazz concert with jazz guitarist, composer and educator Jamie Slater. He has been a fixture in the Charleston jazz scene for over 20 years. Jamie holds a degree in music theory and composition with a concentration in jazz guitar performance from the College of Charleston. He also studied classical guitar under Grammy Award nominee Marc Regnier and jazz guitar under educator and author Jim Bastien. Jamie’s latest album is ‘Augmented Reality,’ which he wrote, recorded and self-produced during the Covid-19 lockdown. Jamie’s trio is made up of himself on the guitar, John Kennedy playing the bass and drummer Josh Hoover. To purchase concert tickets, click here.
Price: Members: $30 | Non-members: $35 | Students and Faculty: $10 with a valid ID

Ongoing special exhibitions

Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice, January 21 – August 7, 2022
William H. Johnson’s Fighters for Freedom series is a tribute to African American activists, scientists, teachers, performers and international heads of state working to bring peace to the world. On view at the Gibbes from Jan. 21 – Aug. 7, 2022, this exhibition is the first-ever presentation of this series in Johnson’s home state of South Carolina. Fighters for Freedom presents well-known Fighters such as Harriet Tubman, George Washington Carver, Marian Anderson and Mahatma Gandhi, as well as some lesser-known individuals whose equally important determination and sacrifice have been eclipsed over time. Images: bit.ly/3EFvqDq

A New Deal: Artists at Work, January 21 – August 7, 2022
The Federal Art Project was formed under President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s ambitious Works Progress Administration (WPA) programs that sent millions of unemployed Americans back to work during the Great Depression, including more than 5,000 artists. The Federal Art Project afforded opportunities to a diverse group of artists, including women, African Americans and recent immigrants, resulting in a collection of artwork intended to uplift the national spirit and encourage creativity in the face of great challenges. The Gibbes is one of a select group of institutions across the country that houses a historic collection of Federal Art Project prints. Images: bit.ly/3rPlDry

William Eggleston: Photographs from the Laura and Jay Crouse Collection, February 25 – October 9, 2022
It is said that William Eggleston’s unique ability to conflate the epic and the everyday has made him one of the most impactful figures in late twentieth century photography. A native of Memphis, Tennessee, Eggleston first photographed his local environs in the 1950s in black-and-white but became one of the first fine art photographers to use color to record his observations in a more heightened and accurate way. Today his strikingly vivid, yet enigmatic images of parked cars, billboards, storefronts, diners and other artifacts of the ordinary world are considered groundbreaking. The photographs presented in this edition of the Gibbes’ Charleston Collects exhibition series were selected from the Laura and Jay Crouse Collection and represent many of the pioneering artist’s most notable works. Images: bit.ly/3svNfla

-Submitted by The Gibbes Museum

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