Seabrookers Are Reading…

When reflecting on reading, author Stephen King once said “Books are a uniquely portable magic.” Why do you read? To escape to a different time and place? To experience someone else’s imagination? To acquire knowledge? To know that you are not alone? To appreciate the craft of writing? To share ideas with others? To be inspired? To relax? Whatever your reason for reading, we hope that you will continue to share your recommendations with our readers.

The Zoologist’s Guide to the Galaxy
by Arik Kershenbaum
Might there be an alien planet with supersonic animals? A moon where creatures have a language composed of smells? Will aliens scream with fear, act honestly, or have technology? Kershenbaum answers these questions using the latest science to tell the story of how life really works, on Earth and in space. (2021, 356pgs; Nonfiction

The Paris Library
by Janet Skeslien Charles
Young, ambitious, and tempestuous, Odile Souchet has it all: Paul, her handsome police officer beau; Margaret, her best friend from England; her adored twin brother Remy; and a dream job at the American Library in Paris, working alongside the library’s legendary director, Dorothy Reeder. But when World War II breaks out, Odile stands to lose everything she holds dear – including her beloved library. Charles explores the geography of resentment, the consequences of terrible choices made, and how extraordinary heroism can be found in the quietest of places. (2021, 353 pgs; Fiction)

House on Endless Waters
by Emunah ElonA lyrical and exquisitely moving novel about a writer who embarks on a transformative journey in Amsterdam, where he discovers the shocking truth about his mother’s wartime experience-unearthing a remarkable story that becomes the subject of his magnum opus. (2020, 309 pgs; Fiction)

Halfway Home
by Reuben Jonathan Miller
A Chicago Cook County Jail chaplain and mass-incarceration sociologist examines the lifelong realities of a criminal record, demonstrating how America’s justice system is less about rehabilitation and more about structured disenfranchisement. (2021, 341 pgs; Nonfiction)

When the Stars Go Dark
by Paula McLain
From The New York Times bestselling author of The Paris Wife comes an atmospheric novel of intertwined fate and heart-wrenching suspense: a detective hiding away from the world; a series of disappearances that reach into her past. Can solving them help her heal? (2021, 370 pgs; Fiction

We look forward to hearing about the books you or your book club recommend.

  • Include your name (although it will not be published), the title, and author of the book you are recommending and email this to Tidelines at seabrookislandblog@gmail.com. (You may be able to click on the email address to open a new message.)
  • For audiobooks, include the name of the narrator.
  • Tidelines editors will provide a blurb to tell a little about the book and add the book jacket image.
  • Publication is at the discretion of Tidelines editors.

Tidelines Editors

(Image and bibliographic credit: CMPL)

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