December Full Moon Bonfire Scheduled for Wednesday, December 14

full-moonFull Moon Bonfire

Wednesday December 14, 2016
Sunset – 5:16 pm
Moonrise – 6:23 pm
High Tide (Rockville): – 8:31 pm
~ Full Cold Moon ~

Another good size crowd enjoyed our November Full Moon Bonfire which included a gorgeous moon rise out of the ocean. December’s full moon will be celebrated a day late on December 14, once again near Boardwalk 1.

To keep things simple, each person brings what you want: food, drinks, chairs and a stick of firewood for a big bonfire. Nothing will be provided but a beautiful beach, a bonfire and, hopefully, a full moon. As a reminder, bring aged firewood as the remains from Matthew are not yet ready to burn even though we’d all like to reduce our piles.

Put these dates for the Full Moon Bonfires on your calendar:

Friday, January 13 (rescheduled from January 12 due to conflicts)
Friday, February 10
Saturday, March 12

There’s always plenty of room on the beach for everyone, so invite a friend or bring your house guests.

The December full moon will be the third consecutive “Supermoon” when the moon appears even lager than normal. One downside is that such a bright Full Moon will largely wipe out the year’s famous Geminid Meteor Showers five to tenfold. With the Moonlight competing with the meteor showers, we’ll be lucky to see a dozen per hour.

How the Full Moon got its name (per Farmers Almanac)

December – The Full Cold Moon; or the Full Long Nights Moon – During this month the winter cold fastens its grip, and nights are at their longest and darkest. It is also sometimes called the Moon before Yule. The term Long Night Moon is a doubly appropriate name because the midwinter night is indeed long, and because the Moon is above the horizon for a long time. The midwinter full Moon has a high trajectory across the sky because it is opposite a low Sun.

I found another web site (http://newsclipper.hubpages.com/hub/The-Moon-Facts-Trivia-and-Folklore)  This site says the Cherokee Indians called it the Snow Moon and the English Medieval name was Oak Moon.

-Submitted by Judy Morr

(Photo credit: nasa.gov)

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