Celebrating Arbor Day on Seabrook Island

Happy Arbor Day! 

South Carolina celebrates the tree planter’s holiday, Arbor Day, on the first Friday in December. Arbor Day in the United States originated in Nebraska City in April 1872, when one million trees were purportedly planted in Nebraska to promote the planting, nurture and celebration of trees. Since then many states and countries have adopted the holiday and observe Arbor Day on different dates throughout the year based upon the best time to plant trees in that area.

For the last 50 years, the Arbor Day Foundation, the largest member nonprofit dedicated to planting trees, has worked to distribute almost 500 million trees throughout the world. 

Here on Seabrook Island, the Green Space Conservancy (SIGSC) is celebrating Arbor Day by planting 3 Eastern redbud trees on a sparsely covered conservation parcel on Rascal Run near the Crabbing Dock. The Seabrook Island Environmental Committee worked with SIGSC on this project, which is an example of how SIPOA and the Conservancy collaborate to better the environment.

With the assistance of Adrea Hutchinson Hughes, SIPOA’s arborist, the redbud tree was chosen because of the site’s sun and soil characteristics as well as its beauty. The trees will have dramatic rosy pink flowers in April and heart-shaped leaves that turn from a reddish color to dark green in the summer and to yellow in the fall. While conservation properties on Seabrook Island are usually left in a purely natural condition, this property will be enhanced by the planting of these trees and also provide a barrier for traffic making a short cut to the crab dock.  We hope you will enjoy the trees as you walk or bike past the property.

For more information about the Seabrook Island Green Space Conservancy, go to sigsc.net

-Submitted by Seabrook Island Green Space

(Image credit: bing.com)

SIB December Activities

   Take a break from the hustle and bustle of the season, get outside, relax with one or more of SIB’s December activities. 

Backyard Birding at Cat Tail Pond

When: Thursday , December 1 at 9:00 am – 11:00 am
Location: 2500 Cat Tail Pond
Max:  12
Cost: None for 2022 members; $10 donation for guests

Come join us in Paula and Bob’s Adamson’s backyard. They live right on the golf course and have six feeders plus a birdbath and two bluebird boxes. They also have two owl boxes. Many birds can be seen from the deck or the yard.  In addition to birds, they also have many turkeys, squirrels, bunnies, raccoons and possums.

As always, be sure to bring your water, binoculars, hats and sunscreen.  

Please register no later than Monday, November 29 by 10:00 am.  All registrants will receive a confirmation letter on Wednesday, November 30. 

Register here

Beyond Our Backyard at Kiawah River

When: Sunday, December 4, 2022, 8:00 am-11:00 am
Location:  Meet at the “bridge” entering the property
Cost: None for members; $10 donation for guests

Another chance to check out birds that can be found on this varied habitat  property.  We expect to see a large variety of birds including Double-crested Cormorants, Egrets, Herons, Osprey and other birds of prey. If we are lucky, we will see an eagle and osprey duel over a fish. As we enter the property, we hope to catch a glimpse of the resident American Coots and Loggerhead Shrikes.  We should also see and hear some of the smaller birds like Tufted Titmice, Eastern Bluebirds, Northern Cardinals.  We will drive to various locations on the property and then walk for better birding observations.  Of course, this also gives us a chance to see this neighboring development.

As always, be sure to bring your binoculars, hats, water and sunscreen.  

Please register no later than Friday, December 2, 2022.  All registrants will receive a confirmation letter on the day prior to the event.

Register here

Roseate Spoonbills, Wood Storks, and Limpkins are SC residents!

When: Wednesday, December 7, 2022. Registration starts at 7:00 pm. Program starts at 7:30 pm

Where: Live Oak Hall, The Lake House

Cost: Free for members, $10 for guests

Max: Limited to 100 members

Roseate Spoonbill, flamboyant with bright pink feathers, red eye staring from a partly bald head, giant spoon-shaped bill! Wood Stork, soaring on thermals with outstretched neck and legs, at three feet tall towering above other wetland birds! Limpkin, its long bill adapted for removing snails from shells, and unforgettable haunting cry! These fascinating birds, two that we enjoy seeing frequently on Seabrook, were once restricted to Florida. Now they all reside and nest in SC!


Craig Watson, bird guide and recent retiree from U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service after 33 years of dedicated bird and habitat conservation, will be our guest. Craig will discuss these fascinating species’ decline and now subsequent increase in population, along with the reasons and implications of their range expansion to SC. Join us to hear Craig’s informative program, along with some enjoyable social time with Seabrook Island Birders’ members and guests!

Register here

December Movie – Hummingbirds


When:
Tuesday, December 13, 2022 from 4:00 pm -5:00 pm
Location: Zoom & Oystercatcher Community Center

David Attenborough takes us into the remarkable lives of hummingbirds via stunning slow motion photography. Everything about these tiny birds is superb and extreme. They have the highest metabolism, fastest heart beat and most rapid wing beat in the avian world. They evolved to feed on flowering plants but are now a crucial part of wider ecosystems. How do they mate, raise their young, and live?

Register here

Learning Together on Crooked Oaks Golf Course

When: Monday, December 19, 2022  8:30 am – 10:30 am (original date was December 12)
Location:  Meet at The Island House (Golf Course Parking Lot next to Spinnaker Beach Houses) for ride along the golf course in golf carts
Max:  24 (If all seats in golf carts are used)
Cost: Free for members; $10 donation for guests – Priority will be given to prior waitlisted & members

The Seabrook Island Club closes one course a day each week and allows Seabrook Island Birders to use golf carts to travel the course with our members to bird. Join us for a morning of birding by riding in golf carts for at least 9-holes on Crooked Oaks golf course. We expect to see a large variety of birds including Egrets, Herons and birds of prey. We will also see and hear some of the smaller birds like Tufted Titmice, Eastern Bluebirds, Northern Cardinals, Carolina Wrens and some of the many warbler species.

Since it is fall/winter, we can also expect to see Eastern Phoebes, Northern Flickers, Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, Belted Kingfishers, Double-crested Cormorants, Bald Eagles, and more!

As always, be sure to bring your binoculars/cameras, hats and sunscreen.  Water will be provided.  We ask that all participants wear a mask when unable to social distance if they are not vaccinated.

Please register no later than Friday prior to the trip.  All registrants will receive a confirmation letter on Sunday, the day prior to the trip.  If you need to cancel, please let us know so we can invite people on the waitlist to attend.


Register here

-Submitted by SIB

(Image credit: SIB)

Hampton Park Illuminated Mushrooms through Dec 11

“Mushrooms,” an illuminated installation, is open now through December 11, 2022 at Hampton Park, 30 May Murray Drive in Charleston. Visitors may access the display, which is adjacent to the Rose Pavilion, daily from 5 am-7 pm.

Charlotte-based artist Meredith Connelly is the creator behind this temporary illuminated installation.  “Mushrooms” consists of more than 100 handcrafted thermoplastic mushroom forms, ranging in height from 8 inches to 12 inches. Each mushroom was created specifically for this site.

“Mushrooms” marks the relaunch of Art in the Park, a public art initiative organized by nonprofit Charleston Parks Conservancy.

Tidelines Editors

(Imagine credit: Meredith Connelly)

SIGSC Celebrates 22 years of Conservation

The Seabrook Island Green Space Conservancy (SIGSC) welcomed over 100 enthusiastic supporters on November 3 to celebrate 22 years of preservation and advocacy.  Over that time, SIGSC has conserved 42 properties totaling more than 30 acres of land on Seabrook Island.  

Conserved properties belong to all Seabrookers and are protected in perpetuity. The most recent property was just added to conserved lands last week. The mission of SIGSC is to facilitate the preservation of substantial green space, habitats for our vast wildlife species and the natural beauty of our island.

These properties are acquired through property and financial donations. In exciting news, Meg Carter, President of SIGSC, announced that these conserved spaces will be marked with permanent signage in the coming months.

 In support of this mission, Charley Moore, accomplished photographer, nature lover, and author of Seabrook Island, South Carolina Green Spaces and Wildlife, made a few remarks about the importance of conservation to the Seabrook Island community.  For a minimum donation of $250, you can receive a signed copy of the book with a special Green Space insert.  For a minimum donation of $100, you can receive two special Green Space Oyster Knives to use at the SIGSC Oyster Roast scheduled for Saturday, March 11, 2023. Donations can be made via our website www.sigsc.net or by mailing a check to SIGSC, 130 Gardeners Circle, PMB 521, Seabrook Island, SC 29455.

-Submitted by Susan Leggett

Full Moon Bonfire Tuesday, Nov 8

Full Moon Bonfire
Tuesday, November 8
Location: On the beach between BW 1 and 2
Sunset – 5:23 pm
Moonrise – 5:34 pm
High Tide – 8:09 pm
Full Beaver Moon

The end of Daylight Saving Time means an earlier sunset. The evenings are cooler, perfect for a great time with family and friends on the beach with a bonfire.

To keep things simple, each person brings what you want: food, drinks, chairs, and a stick of firewood for a big bonfire. Nothing will be provided but a beautiful beach, a bonfire, and, hopefully, a full moon.

People ask if the bonfire will be held if it’s rainy. The bonfire will be canceled if it is raining or rain is threatening as few would be comfortable attending.

By terms of the permit, the fire needs to be out no later than 10:00 pm. The earlier sunset gives us plenty of time to enjoy the evening. We can be home in time for election results.

There is a lunar eclipse on November 8. Unfortunately, it is at 5:59 am (I’ll still be in bed) so we won’t be able to enjoy it at our bonfire. For you early birds, the International Space Station will also have a visible fly-by that morning at 5:26 am.

Put these dates for the Full Moon Bonfires on your calendar:

  • Thursday, December 8, 2022 (scheduled the day after the actual full moon so moonrise is after sunset)
  • Saturday, January 7, 2023 (again rescheduled for day after actual full moon so moonrise is after sunset)
  • Monday, February 6, 2023 (again rescheduled for day after actual full moon so moonrise is after sunset)

There’s always plenty of room on the beach for everyone, so invite a friend or bring your house guests.

How the Full Moon got its name:  Per Old Farmer’s Almanac, November is Full Beaver Moon. This was the time when beavers finished preparations for winter and retreated into their lodges.

Other names:  
• Deer Rutting Moon
• Digging/Scratching Moon
• Freezing Moon
• Frost Moon
• Whitefish Moon


I found another website – The Moon Facts Trivia and Folklore. This site says the Cherokee Indians called it the Trading Moon and the English Medieval name was the Snow Moon.  

Another website, space.com, says the Chinese call it White Moon.

-Submitted by Judy Morr

(Image credit:  Universe Today)

SINHG Members Explore On Land And Sea This Fall

Members of the Seabrook Island Natural History Group (SINHG) traveled all over the Lowcountry on October’s SINHG Trip schedule.

During a tour of The Citadel, members learned the importance of the treasured Citadel Ring, bestowed at the beginning of each cadet’s Senior year (and that newly-shaved freshman are called “nobs”).

Fifteen members took to Horseshoe Creek via kayak spotting the creek’s abundant birdlife, with sightings of the Pileated Woodpecker, while a dozen SINHG members viewed downtown through the lens of the city’s Charleston Renaissance of the early 20th century.

Another tour focused on the South of Broad and French Quarter neighborhoods, culminating in a delicious lunch at the historic State Street dining room, based on recipes from the city’s 19th century cookbooks.

Two member groups enjoyed a tour of Charleston Harbor and the Intercoastal Waterway aboard the 24-foot SS Charleston, taking in along the way Shem Creek, the iconic Ravenel Bridge and Fort Sumter.



October’s trips concluded with an Easy Rider Bike tour through Old Mount Pleasant and Sullivan’s Island.


SINHG Trips for members will continue through early December. To learn more about SINHG Trips and membership, visit sinhg.org.

-Submitted by Norm Powers, for SINHG

Diamonds In The Mud

While much attention is justly focused on the endangered, seafaring loggerhead turtle population that nests here every summer, a less threatened cousin that spends all its time on the island also faces threats from habitat loss and human activity. The Carolina diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin centrata), with distinctive circular markings on its carapace, inhabits the brackish waters of our salt marshes and tidal creeks, feeding on crabs, snails, fish, oysters, and mussels. It’s the only turtle species known to prefer brackish water. Its attraction to crab pots is one threat, sometimes trapping and drowning the animal. Encounters with motorized boats are another potential cause of mortality. Habitat loss from warming and rising water levels, or from human development along estuaries and inlets, is an increasing challenge for diamondbacks, which are found all along the Atlantic coast from Cape Hatteras to Florida. Although not considered endangered, terrapins are an important indicator species for water quality, with populations all along the coast monitored regularly.

The term “terrapin” is applied to land-based turtles, as opposed to marine species like the loggerhead. Carolina terrapins are active nearly all year round, living in burrows dug in mudflats and hibernating there during colder months. Its shell ranges from gray to light green or brown and is marked by concentric growth rings that indicate age, which can be measured in decades. One male specimen found on Kiawah had originally been tagged in the 1980s and was found still active and healthy twenty-five years later.

Like their seagoing relations, diamondback females lay their eggs, starting in late spring, in nests dug in sandy banks above the high tide line, which may bring females looking for nesting sites disastrously in contact with vehicular traffic along roads built too close to the water. The nests are often raided by raccoons, foxes, and seagulls.

But the good news is that Carolina terrapins have recovered from near-extinction in the early twentieth century when their pale yellow meat was considered a delicacy. They were eagerly hunted to supply restaurants and fish markets, bringing high prices that climbed even higher as it became more difficult finding them by digging out of their hibernation burrows. Today, although legally harvestable, they’re thankfully no longer considered suitable for the dining table and no commercial hunting permits have been issued by South Carolina for many years, allowing populations to rebound.

Seabrook Island Natural History Group is one of the island’s oldest and largest special interest groups dedicated to exploring the ecology, history, and culture of the Carolina Lowcountry. For more information about SINHG, click here.

-Submitted by Seabrook Island Natural History Group

SIGC to Host Local Author of Green Spaces and Wildlife

Friday, November 11
Presenter: Charles Moore

Location: Oyster Catcher Community Center

Greeting and refreshments: 9:30 am
Business meeting: 9:45
am
Presentation: 10:00 am with Q&A following

Join us for the Seabrook Island Garden Club’s November meeting, featuring guest speaker, Charles Moore, well known former Seabrook Island resident, as he delivers a presentation on the importance of green space on Seabrook Island.

The survival of all wild things depends on their ability to find suitable food and habitat. Seabrook Island is blessed with a healthy wildlife community of whitetail deer (including the uniquely colored piebald deer), bobcats, raccoons, alligators, opossums, foxes, turtles, dolphins and over 130 species of birds. The lush vegetation and natural beauty of our island are no accident, but are instead the result of the vision of the original developers, with the establishment of strong environmental covenants and continued environmental stewardship by its residents.

Traveling the South Carolina coastal area for twenty-eight years and living for fifteen years here in Seabrook Island, author Charles J. Moore came to understand the importance of green spaces for wildlife survival. He has used his lifelong love of photography to convey the natural beauty and abundance of wildlife of Seabrook Island. The mission of the Seabrook Island Green Space Conservancy is to preserve and enhance the natural environment on Seabrook Island through acquisition of land and land easements, through education on environmental topics, and through advocacy of conservation issues. Charles’s book will be available for purchase via cash, check or Venmo.

We look forward to welcoming you to the garden club! *Non-Garden Club members may attend for a $5 donation.

The 2022-23 Seabrook Island Garden Club: Let’s Talk Some Dirt!

-Submitted by Beth Wright, Seabrook Island Garden Club Publicity

November SIB Activities

SIB has plenty of activities leading up to the holidays. Get in a bit of fun, fresh (low humidity) air, and exercise before the holidays take place. 

Wine & Backyard Birding at Marsh Hen

When: Thursday, November 3, 2022, 3:00 pm-5:00 pm 
Location: 2335 Marsh Hen Drive
Max:  12
Cost: None for members; $10 donation for guests

Join SIB for wine and backyard birding at the home of Carole and Rick Heilman Their home is a beautiful, large wooded lot that has many songbird visitors. There are Wild Turkeys there too! The Heilmans have an elaborate bird feeding system set up on two sides of the yard with a nice seating area. There will be wine and light snacks served for those who want, with an outside deck and inside porch for bird viewing. Please come in from the front door.

As always, be sure to bring your water, binoculars, hats and sunscreen.  

Please register no later than Tuesday, November 1 by 10:00 am.  All registrants will receive a confirmation letter on November 2 .  

Register here

Beyond our Backyard – Biking & Birding the Greenway

When: Wednesday, November 9, 2022, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm
Location:  Meet at the parking area for West Ashley Greenway (McLeod Mill Rd. near Main Rd./SR S 10-20)
Max:  12
Cost: None for members; $10 donation for guests

Grab your bike and join us as we bike the West Ashley Greenway! This trail stretches about eight miles from Johns Island to the South Windermere Shopping Center on Folly Road (parking available at either end). The trail is open from dawn to dusk. It’s 100 feet wide and mostly hard-packed dirt and some asphalt. Plus, the trail is flat so it’s great for beginner bikers and kids. For the most part, the trail runs parallel to U.S. Highway 17 past neighborhoods, parks and marshes so there’s plenty to see. The City of Charleston Department of Parks has confirmed motorized handicap scooters may utilize the Greenway for this activity so some members may want to “bike” the Greenway in their scooters.

On Johns Island, the dirt gives way to rough gravel and narrow bridge crossings (beach/mountain bikes are better than road bikes on this section). Here the broad wetlands flank the trail, presenting magnificent views and rewarding bird sightings. If our timing is right, we may catch sight of the tidal flow that carved these lacework channels.

The map of this Rails-to-Trails site can be found here.  

Join several SIB Executive Committee Members for this biking & birding trip at the West Ashley Greenway. We hope to see shorebirds like egrets, herons and Roseate Spoonbills in the tidal marsh areas. We should see/hear some of our winter residents like Eastern Phoebe, Northern Flicker and Palm Warbler. Birds of prey are also common to see flying overhead. Fifty eight species were seen or heard when we did this ride in December 2021 .  

Be sure to bring binoculars, camera, hats, sunscreen, bug repellant, snacks and water. Once we complete our ride, some participants will likely visit Angel Oak Cafe for lunch where all are welcome to join us.

Please register no later than Monday, November 7, 2022.  All registrants will receive a confirmation letter the day prior to the event.

Register here

Learning Together at North Beach

When: Tuesday November 15, 2022  10:00 am – 12:00 am (high tide: 12:44 pm)
Location:  Meet at Boardwalk # 1 parking lot
Max:  None
Cost: Free for members; $10 donation for guests 

Join SIB Shorebird Steward leader, Mark Andrews, to bird at Seabrook Island’s North Beach. This three mile round trip walk travels from Board Walk #1 to the tip of North Beach along Captain Sam’s Inlet as high tide approaches. Birders from beginners to advanced will enjoy the variety of birds found on North Beach. At this time of year, many different species of shorebirds rest and feed near the point or along the beach ridge near the beach’s pond. Along the way, we will explore the many different species that can be found in this unique area.  Piping Plovers and other winter residents should have returned from their summer nesting areas.

As always, be sure to bring your binoculars/cameras, hats and sunscreen. There should be spotting scopes available for viewing. Bring plenty to drink and a snack if desired. There are no facilities.  

Please register no later than November 13.  All registrants will receive a confirmation letter on November 14, the day prior to the trip. If you need to cancel, please let us know so we can invite people on the waitlist to attend.

Register here

Beyond Our Backyard – Caw Caw County Park

When: Nov 18, 2022, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm 

Where: Caw Caw Interpretive Center, 5200 Savannah Hwy.  Ravenel  

Carpool:  Meet at Seabrook Island Real Estate Office at 8:15 am. The drive is approximately 40 minutes.  

Cost: Free to members, $5 for non- members (Park entrance fee is $2 per adult, or a gold pass)

Join SIB at Caw Caw County Park as we look for resident wintering birds. The park is comprised of three colonial era rice fields, fresh, brackish, saltwater marshes, cypress-tupelo swamps, bottomland, and beech-holly forests.  All told, these varied habitats comprise a total of 654 acres with six miles of trails.  Over 250 bird species have been observed within the boundaries of Caw Caw.  

Some of the bird species we may find during this time of the year include wading birds, ducks, Eastern Phoebe, Yellow Bellied Sapsucker, Ruby and Golden Crowned Kinglets, Red Breasted Nuthatch, Bobolink, Yellow Throated Warbler, Blue Headed Vireos, Pine Warbler, Northern Paula, White-Eyed Vireo, Wilson’s Snipe, Loggerhead Shrike, Rusty Blackbird, Brown Creeper, Winter Wrens and a variety of raptors.

Appropriate footwear is recommended, as a likely walking distance of two miles is expected, and even during dry spells, wet trail conditions may be encountered. Participants should also consider these other items to maximize their comfort and enjoyment: binoculars, bug spray, sunscreen, hats, layered clothing to adjust to the morning’s weather, field guides if print is your preference, eyeglass – lens cleaner, water, snacks, camera, and a pack or shoulder bag for your needs.    

Please register prior to Nov 15, 2022.  You will receive a confirmation letter the day prior to the event.  

Register here

Learning Together on Crooked Oaks Golf Course

When: Monday, November 21, 2022,  8:30 am – 10:30 am
Location:  Meet at Island House (Golf Course Parking Lot next to Spinnaker Beach Houses) for ride along the golf course in golf carts
Max:  24 (If all seats in golf carts are used)
Cost: Free for members; $10 donation for guests – Priority will be given to prior waitlisted & members

The Seabrook Island Club closes one course a day each week and allows SIB to use golf carts to travel the course to bird. Join us for a morning of birding by riding in golf carts for at least 9-holes on Crooked Oaks golf course. We expect to see a large variety of birds including Egrets, Herons and birds of prey. We will also see and hear some of the smaller birds like Tufted Titmice, Eastern Bluebirds, Northern Cardinals, Carolina Wrens and some of the many warbler species.

 Since it is fall/winter, we can also expect to see Eastern Phoebes, Northern Flickers, Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, Belted Kingfishers, Double-crested Cormorants, Bald Eagles, and more!

As always, be sure to bring your binoculars/cameras, hats and sunscreen.  Water will be provided.  

Please register no later than Friday prior to the trip. All registrants will receive a confirmation letter on the day prior to the trip. If you need to cancel, please let us know so we can invite people on the waitlist to attend.

Register here

Learning Together – Camp St. Christopher Conference Center

When: Friday, November 25, 2022, 8:00 am-11:00 am
Where: Meet at bus parking lot at St. Christopher
Max:  10
Cost: Voluntary donation to Camp St.Christopher

Come walk off the bird by doing some birding!!! Explore the lakes, lagoons, paths and slough at St. Christopher. This event will have one to two miles of walking over uneven terrain. We  should see all the usual suspects, but will also hopefully get a look at our some of our winter friends-Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Northern Flicker, Yellow-rumped Warbler and sparrows.

Bring sun block, bug spray, a hat, water and binoculars. We are asking our attendees to make a voluntary contribution to Camp St. Christopher to help support their efforts after a few trying years.

Please register no later than Wednesday, November 23, 2021. All registrants will receive a confirmation letter on Thursday, November 24, 2022.  If you need to cancel, please let us know so we can invite people on the waitlist to attend.

Register here

Beyond our Backyard – Kiawah Preserve

When: Tuesday, November 29, 2022, 8:00 am-11:00 am
Location:  Meet at the parking lot by The Station at Freshfields at 8:00 am
Max: There is a limit of 12 people, in three cars. Passes for Kiawah will be obtained the night before
Cost: None for members; $10 donation for guests

We will be birding through a well maintained trail through a variety of habitats including wetlands, maritime forest, ponds and a waterway. There’s an observation tower for those who would like to do some climbing to get a better view. Hopefully, we will see some late migrants, as well as birds that are overwintering there. 

As always, be sure to bring your binoculars, hats, water and sunscreen.   

All registrants will receive a confirmation letter on Monday, November 28.  

Register here   

Backyard Birding at Cat Tail Pond

When: Thursday, December 1, 9:00 am – 11:00 am
Location: 2500 Cat Tail Pond
Max: 12
Cost: None for 2022 members; $10 donation for guests

Come join us in Paula and Bob’s Adamson’s backyard. They live right on the golf course and have six feeders plus a birdbath and two bluebird boxes. They even have two owl boxes. Many birds can be seen from the deck or the yard.  In addition to birds, they have turkeys, squirrels, bunnies, raccoons and possums.

As always, be sure to bring your water, binoculars, hats and sunscreen.   

Please register no later than Monday November 29 at 10:00 am. All registrants will receive a confirmation letter on Wednesday, November 30. 

Register here   

-Submitted by SIB

Get the Scoop: Indigenous, Invasive & Deer-Resistant Plant Species, Oct 27

Get the Scoop:

Indigenous, Invasive & Deer-Resistant Plant Species
Thursday, October 27, 2022, 1:30 pm
Oyster Catcher Community Center

This year, SIPOA investigated the status of several invasive plant species on Seabrook Island as part of the engineering intern program. Invasive species were inventoried on SIPOA properties.

On October 27, 2022, there will be a Get the Scoop meeting at the Community Center at 1:30 pm to discuss Indigenous, Invasive and Deer Resistant Plant Species on Seabrook Island.

Adrea Hughes (SIPOA) will discuss indigenous, non-native and invasive plant species. Steve Hirsch (SIPOA) will review the results of SIPOA’s invasive plant species inventory that was completed this year. Tyler Collins (The Greenery) will discuss deer resistant plant species.

Residents interested in learning more about this topic or the results of SIPOA’s invasive inventory should plan to attend! You may click here and scroll down to learn more as well.

-Submitted by SIPOA

(Image credit: Jane Marvin)