SIUC Water Update

Update: Water Usage

Seabrook Island Utility Commission is back to normal operations. Thank you for cooperating with conserving water over the past two days to assist Charleston Water Systems during their high water demand due to the freezing weather.

-Submitted by Annie Smith-Jones, Chair, SIUC

Notice from SIUC

Notice From Seabrook Island Utility Commission (SIUC):

Charleston Water System (CWS) is experiencing a very high demand for water from the freezing weather that has caused water line breaks throughout its system.

A news article out yesterday stated that CWS is at maximum production, and if the pressure continues to drop in the system, they would have to put out a boil water notice due to low pressure. In addition, we are experiencing a slightly higher demand than average for this time of year due to customers dripping lines to prevent freezing. 

Please conserve water as much as possible to assist CWS and stop dripping water as soon as temperatures exceed freezing.

As we obtain all our water from Charleston Water System, we will follow their advisories. We will pass along more information as the situation changes.

-Submitted by Annie Smith-Jones, Chair, SIUC

Possible Freezing Temperatures This Weekend

Storm Team 2 is forecasting freezing temperatures in the coastline areas overnight Friday, December 23, through Monday, December 26. Rain is not predicted at this time, but the temperatures are expected to be below freezing. The possibility of high winds may make the wind chill temperatures even lower. Storm Team 2 is also predicting single digit wind chill temperatures.

There are several things you may want to do to prepare for temperatures below 32°F.

  • Plants are the most susceptible to damage during freezing temperatures. Bring them in if possible or cover the most fragile ones. Fabric, bed sheets, burlap, or commercial frost cloths are good insulators. Don’t use plastic. Click here to read more about protecting your plants.
  • Protect your exterior water pipes from freezing by dripping exterior faucets (slow droplets or slow streams of water) and turning off irrigation systems to help reduce damage from freezing and breaking. If you have insulation covers, now is the time to put them on. Click here for more tips on protecting your home from freezing temperatures.
  • If you live in a house or villa that is raised above the ground, you may want to drip your interior faucets as well.
  • Consider leaving cabinet doors open in the kitchen and bathrooms, so your pipes will be warmed from the room air.
  • Know where your water shut off valve is in case you need to turn off the water.
  • Keep an eye on your pets as you let them out. They too can slip and fall on the ice.

Be prepared, be safe.

Tidelines Editors.

Tropical Storm Nicole Updates for Seabrook Island, Nov 10, 10:45 am

Tropical Storm Nicole is bringing strong winds and heavy rains to the Charleston/Seabrook Island Areas. In anticipation of the conditions deteriorating, we have received notification of the following:.

  • The Lake House will close at 1:00 pm this afternoon. Property Owners and Club Members with after-hours access will be able to enter the facility using their Property Owner/Club Member amenity cards.
  • The Seabrook Island Natural History Group program slated for this evening at The Lake House will be postponed. We will schedule a post about the new date when we receive that information.
  • The SIPOA offices will close at 1:00 pm today to allow time for employees to travel home before the peak of the storm arrives. To access information on the Flood Education Program, click here.

We also received a report this morning that several of the streets on Seabrook Island are experiencing high water. High tide was around 9:15 am, so in addition to the wind and rain, some of the streets are flooded. The entrance to Bohicket Marina is also underwater.

Remember, please don’t drive through high water. You don’t know what has happened to the road under the water.

Be careful, stay safe.

Tidelines Editors

Subtropical Storm Nicole, Heavy Rainfall Expected

banner weather alertNovember 7, 2022 – 11:00 am

The National Hurricane Center issued the following key messages regarding Subtropical Storm Nicole at 11:00 am on Monday, November 7, 2022:

For storm information specific to our area, including possible inland watches and warnings, please monitor products issued by the local National Weather Service forecast office and other reliable local weather sources.

For more information, please visit the National Hurricane Center website

Property owners and managers with rental guests should forward this information to their rental guests.

Tidelines Editors

King Tides in the Charleston Area October 26-28

King Tide is a non-scientific term used to describe high tides that are higher than normal. They usually occur during a full or new moon or during specific seasons throughout the year. They can cause flooding of low-lying areas resulting in road closures that may disrupt normal daily routines. This is particularly true when a king tide coincides with significant precipitation.

The 2022 predicted king tides are:

  • October 26-28 
  • November 23-26 
  • December 23-25  

Remember to clear debris blocking the drains near your home before predicted king tides and if your home is prone to flooding, you might want to prepare your ground level for flooding.

SCDOT warns: Please use caution in areas that are impacted by flooding. It takes just 12 inches of water to carry away most cars and just 2 feet of rushing water can carry away SUVs and trucks. Never drive around barricades. Turn around, don’t drown.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is leading the South Carolina King Tides Initiative to document the effect that extreme tide events have on our state’s beaches, coastal waterways, private property, and public infrastructure. For more information on king tides and the Initiative, click here.

Tidelines Editors

The Great Southeast ShakeOut Earthquake Drill 2022

Many people do not realize that Charleston is in an earthquake zone. In 1886, an earthquake with a magnitude estimated between 6.9 and 7.3 caused 100 deaths and damage to about 7,000 buildings.

Dr. Erin Beutel, College of Charleston Geology & Geosciences Department, provided Tidelines with the following map from the USGS that shows the areas with the highest and lowest earthquake vulnerability. As you can see, Charleston is in the risk zone.

This year’s International ShakeOut Day is October 20,2022, when millions of people worldwide will participate in earthquake drills at work, school, or home.

At 10:20 am (local time) on 10/20/22, you can join more than a million people across the Southeast U.S. practicing earthquake safety.

It’s actually a good idea to practice earthquake safety in different situations each year, and ShakeOut Organizers are here to support you. For more information, click here.

Tidelines Editors

(Image and information credit: FEMA)

Hurricane Ian Advisory #7 – October 1, 2022 (Final)

Hurricane Ian Advisory #7 (Final)
October 1, 2022 – 12:00 pm

Hurricane Ian made landfall on the afternoon of Friday, September 30, 2022, as a Category 1 storm near Georgetown, SC, with maximum sustained winds of 85 miles per hour. Now a Post Tropical Cyclone, Ian continues to move away from our area and into the mid-Atlantic region. All severe weather warnings have been cancelled for the state of South Carolina, and no hazardous weather is expected this weekend and into next week.

Earlier this morning, officials from the Town of Seabrook Island, the Seabrook Island Property Owners Association (SIPOA), and volunteers from the Seabrook Island Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) conducted a preliminary damage assessment of the town. While some trees and limbs have been downed by heavy winds, the town has received no reports of any significant damage. At this time, all utilities remain operational and all roads within the town are passable; however, residents and visitors are advised to use caution when traveling as vegetative debris and pockets of standing water may remain on roadways and pathways for the next several days.

Residents are encouraged to report any structural damage, downed trees, and areas of localized flooding to the town as soon as possible. Damage reports may be sent via email to jcronin@townofseabrookisland.org. Please include your name, address, and photos of the damage (if available). The reporting of this information should not be considered a claim for reimbursement. Residents should file claims for damage or other losses with their insurance company. Any information received from residents and property owners will be aggregated and reported to Charleston County as part of a countywide damage assessment.

The town has returned to OPCON 3 (Normal Operations). Town Hall will re-open for regular officer hours at 8:00 am on Monday.

This is the final town advisory regarding Hurricane Ian.

Property owners and managers with rental guests should forward this information to their rental guests. Owners and managers of commercial establishments are also encouraged to share this information with their employees.

-Submitted by Joseph M. Cronin, Town Administrator, Town of Seabrook Island

Hurricane Ian Advisory #6 – September 30, 2022

Hurricane Ian Advisory #6
September 30, 2022 – 3:00 pm

Hurricane Ian made landfall this afternoon as a Category 1 storm near Georgetown, SC, with maximum sustained winds of 85 miles per hour. The area remains under a HURRICANE WARNING and FLASH FLOOD WARNING.  

Per National Weather Service Charleston, gusts of more than 70 mph have been recorded in Charleston Harbor. Based on the storm’s track as it approached the coast, the offshore wind direction reduced the threat of major flooding in our area; however, there are still many road closures, downed trees, and scattered power outages throughout the county. Tropical storm force winds and heavy rains are forecast to continue in the Charleston Tri-County area for the remainder of this afternoon and are expected to decrease after 6:00 pm today. There are no significant weather concerns for Saturday.  

St. John’s Fire District reports that several trees have been downed across their service area. Most roadways have been cleared, but River Road is currently closed at Burden Creek Road due to a very large tree down across the road. SCDOT has been made aware of the issue, but SJFD is uncertain on the time frame for clearing. Parts of Johns Island remain without power/internet. 

Charleston County’s emergency status remains at OPCON 1 (Disaster Imminent or Occurring / Full Emergency Response Operations), and all county offices are closed today. The county’s citizen information line is available for non-emergency calls between the hours of 8:00 am and 8:00 pm at (843) 746-3900. For shelter locations, please contact the county’s citizen information line or visit the county website at www.charlestoncounty.org

The Town of Seabrook Island is currently at OPCON 2 (Enhanced Readiness / Disaster Impacts Likely). Town offices remain closed today and all beach patrol services have been suspended. Officials from the town will conduct a damage assessment at 10:00 am on Saturday. Residents are encouraged to report structural damage, downed trees, and areas of localized flooding. Damage reports may be sent via email to jcronin@townofseabrookisland.org. Please include your name, address, and photos (if available). 

Residents, property owners, and visitors are advised to monitor local media outlets for updates on Hurricane Ian. Forecasts are also updated regularly on the National Hurricane Center website at www.hurricanes.gov

Until conditions begin improving later this evening, individuals are encouraged to heed the following recommendations: 

  • Be prepared for the possible loss of power 
  • Shelter in place and avoid unnecessary travel 
  • Do not walk or drive through water 
  • Be advised that bridges on and off Johns Island and throughout the county may be deemed unsafe for travel due to high winds 
  • Call 911 in the event of an emergency; however, be advised that police, fire, and EMS resources may be limited and/or relocated during high winds and/or flooding 

The next Town advisory is anticipated to be distributed on the afternoon of Saturday, October 1, unless conditions warrant an earlier update.

Property owners and managers with rental guests should forward this information to their rental guests. Owners and managers of commercial establishments are also encouraged to share this information with their employees.

Official updates from the town will be posted on the following town channels, as warranted:

Sign up for the Town’s emergency notification system CodeRED. If you are unsure if you are registered, you can re-register without receiving duplicate notices. Be sure to opt-in for severe weather warning alerts. Click here to register.

In the event of an emergency, please call 911. Emergency calls to 911 should be reserved for life-threatening situations, or for the reporting of a crime or fire. Do NOT call 911 if you have water in your home unless your life is in danger. Do NOT call 911 to report a power outage. Power outages should be reported directly to Berkeley Electric Cooperative.

-Submitted by Joseph M. Cronin, Town Administrator, Town of Seabrook Island

Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Hurricane Ian is bearing down on the Lowcountry causing increased flooding . When you see flood waters ahead, please turn around, don’t drown. A recent tweet from Charleston County reminds us not to drive through standing water, especially if barriers have been put up across the road.

If you come to an area that is covered with flood water, you will not know the depth of the water, the condition of the ground under the water, or if a man hole cover has popped open. In addition, road beds may be washed out under flood waters and you may get stuck in muddy water or worst case scenario, drown.

People underestimate the force and power of water. Six inches of fast-moving flood water can knock over an adult, and it takes only two feet of rushing water to float most vehicles. More than half of all flood fatalities result from automobiles being swept downstream. Please stay safe. Remember:

Tidelines Editors

(Image credit: Charleston County)

Hurricane Ian Advisory #5 – September 29, 2022

Hurricane Ian Advisory #5
September 29, 2022 – 3:00 pm

Tropical Storm Ian has emerged from the east coast of Florida and has entered the Atlantic Ocean. Ian currently has maximum sustained winds of 70 miles per hour. Additional strengthening is possible over the next 24 hours. The current forecast calls for Ian to regain hurricane status prior to making a second landfall on the South Carolina coast on Friday.

As of 11:00 am on Thursday, the National Weather Service has issued a HURRICANE WARNING for the entire South Carolina coast. This means that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected within the specified area. A STORM SURGE WARNING remains in effect for the entire coast.

According to NWS Charleston, there is high confidence that Hurricane Ian will impact our area. Below is a summary of today’s report from NWS Charleston:

  • Minor wind damage is possible today and tonight. Minor to moderate wind damage will be possible on Friday and into Friday evening. The strongest tropical storm force winds (39-73 mph), and possibly low-end hurricane force wind gusts (74+ mph), are expected along the immediate coast and within any rain bands on Friday and into Friday evening.
  • Life threatening storm surge inundation is expected, especially on Friday. Major coastal flooding is expected today and tonight through Friday, especially during times of high tide. A storm surge of 4-7 feet is possible in Charleston County.
  • Moderate to high threat for flooding rainfall, especially on Friday. A total of 4-8 inches of rain is anticipated, with localized amounts as high as 12 inches along and east of I-95.
  • Isolated tornadoes are possible, mainly within stronger rain bands on Friday and into Friday evening. The highest threat for tornadoes will be in the Charleston Tri-County region.
  • Life-threatening marine/surf conditions will exist through Friday. Moderate to severe beach erosion, high surf conditions and dangerous rip currents are expected.

As of 2:00 pm Thursday, Charleston County has moved to OPCON 1 (Disaster Imminent or Occurring / Full Emergency Response Operations). County offices will remain closed on Friday. Charleston County Emergency Management Department (CCEMD) encourages residents in low-lying and flood prone areas to consider relocating during the storm. The county’s citizen information line will be available for non-emergency calls between 8:00 am to 8:00 pm at (843) 746-3900. For shelter locations, opening times, and transportation options, please contact the county’s citizen information line or visit the county website at www.charlestoncounty.org.

The Town of Seabrook Island is currently at OPCON 2 (Enhanced Readiness / Disaster Impacts Likely). Town offices closed at 12:00 pm on Thursday and will remain closed on Friday. Beach patrol services will also be suspended on Friday.

Residents, property owners, and visitors are strongly advised to monitor local media outlets for updates on Tropical Storm Ian and to prepare for potential storm impacts. Forecasts are also updated regularly on the National Hurricane Center website at www.hurricanes.gov.

As conditions in our area begin to deteriorate later today and especially Friday, individuals are encouraged to heed the following recommendations:

  • Be prepared for flooding, especially during periods of high tide (around 11:00 pm on Thursday, noon and midnight on Friday)
  • If you live in a low-lying area, consider relocating to higher ground during the storm
  • Be prepared for the possible loss of power
  • Secure trash cans, yard furniture, and other outdoor items
  • Shelter in place and avoid unnecessary travel
  • Do not walk or drive through water
  • Be advised that bridges on and off Johns Island and throughout the county may be deemed unsafe for travel due to high winds
  • Call 911 in the event of an emergency; however, be advised that police, fire, and EMS resources may be limited and/or relocated during high winds and/or flooding
  • Review the South Carolina Hurricane Guide for additional information

The next Town advisory is anticipated to be distributed on the afternoon of Friday, September 30th, unless conditions warrant an earlier update.

Property owners and managers with rental guests should forward this information to their rental guests. Owners and managers of commercial establishments are also encouraged to share this information with their employees.

Official updates from the town will be posted on the following town channels, as warranted:

Sign up for the Town’s emergency notification system CodeRED. If you are unsure if you are registered, you can re-register without receiving duplicate notices. Be sure to opt-in for severe weather warning alerts. Click here to register.

In the event of an emergency, please call 911. Emergency calls to 911 should be reserved for life-threatening situations, or for the reporting of a crime or fire. Do NOT call 911 if you have water in your home unless your life is in danger. Do NOT call 911 to report a power outage. Power outages should be reported directly to Berkeley Electric Cooperative.

-Submitted by Joseph M. Cronin, Town Administrator, Town of Seabrook Island

High Tide & Rip Currents Warning Sep 29

On Thursday, September 29, 2022, the National Weather Service issued the following warnings:

Minor to moderate coastal flooding is expected along the SE SC & SE GA coast within a few hours of high tide late this morning (around 11 AM). Do not drive through water of unknown depth. Take necessary actions to protect flood prone property.

To see a local tide table, click here.


There is a High Risk of rip currents along all southeast SC & GA beaches today. Dangerous rip currents and surf conditions are expected.

To access the article published by Tidelines about rip currents, click here.

Tidelines Editors