Hurricane Season Continues

The 2022 Atlantic hurricane season has statistically reached its peak. Currently, Hurricane Fiona is bringing stormy conditions to Turks and Caicos after having pounded Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic with heavy rains and winds.

As Fiona moves into the Atlantic, she is likely to strengthen as she passes us offshore. What does this mean for the Lowcountry? If Fiona strengthens it could impact potential swells that reach our beaches. Swells are collections of waves produced by storm winds that could be blowing hundreds of miles out at sea. To learn more about swells, click here.

Dangerous rip currents are also a possibility later this week for our beaches. Now is a good time to review what are rip currents and how to get out of them if you’re trapped in one. A recent article on rip currents posted on Tidelines can be found here.

Stay safe at the beach.

Tidelines Editors

King Tides in the Charleston Area September 7-10

King Tide is a non-scientific term used to describe high tides that are higher than normal. They usually occur during a full or new moon or during specific seasons throughout the year. They can cause flooding of low-lying areas resulting in road closures that may disrupt normal daily routines. This is particularly true when a king tide coincides with significant precipitation.

The 2022 predicted king tides are:

  • September 7-10 
  • October 26-28 
  • November 23-26 
  • December 23-25  

Remember to clear debris blocking the drains near your home before predicted king tides and if your home is prone to flooding, you might want to prepare your ground level for flooding.

SCDOT warns: Please use caution in areas that are impacted by flooding. It takes just 12 inches of water to carry away most cars and just 2 feet of rushing water can carry away SUVs and trucks. Never drive around barricades. Turn around, don’t drown.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is leading the South Carolina King Tides Initiative to document the effect that extreme tide events have on our state’s beaches, coastal waterways, private property, and public infrastructure. For more information on king tides and the Initiative, click here.

Tidelines Editors

Hurricane Season Peaks September 10

The 2022 hurricane season has been a quiet one. To date only three named storms have formed with Tropical Storm Colin springing up along the South Carolina coast in early July threatening to dampen the Independence Day weekend. All this could change quickly. 

Roughly 90% of all Atlantic tropical weather typically occurs in August, September and early October.  Hurricane season peaks on September 10. The majority of the biggest storms have appeared within a week or two of September 10.

Now is the time to complete your hurricane preparations. Tidelines began publishing our Hurricane Hints series in 2017. You can find our Hurricane Hints anytime on the Tidelines website. Use the Hurricane Hints dropdown menu.

Remember, be prepared; stay safe.

Tidelines Editors

Do You Know…About Rip Currents?

Do you know… great weather for the beach does not always mean it is safe to swim in the ocean? Rip currents often form on calm, sunny days.

Hurricane season is here so it is important to know how deadly rip currents can be, since they are more prevalent during this time of the year. In fact, according to the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), there have been 35 rip current-related deaths and 21 surf zone related deaths in the US this year. 

NOAA describes rip currents as powerful, narrow rivers of fast-moving water that can travel up to eight feet per second flowing away from the shore. That is faster than an Olympic swimmer! Rip currents are sometimes hard to see, although you can often see churning or disturbance on the surface of the water.

Rip currents occur when waves break near the shoreline and/or sandbars, piling up water between the breaking waves and the beach or sandbar. The water going out to the ocean moves very fast, thus causing the rip current.

It is important not to go into the ocean when there is a rip current warning!

If you happen to get caught in one, and you can stand up, you should wade or walk, don’t swim, back to shore. If you can’t stand up, swim parallel to the shore until you are no longer in the rip current and then swim for shore.  Also, shout for help so others know you are in trouble.

To see if there are rip currents in our area, go to weather.gov by clicking here.

Stay safe at the beach.

Property owners should share this information with visitors and rental guests. Our Do You Know…? posts may be accessed at any time on the Tidelines website via the drop down menu entitled “Do You Know” located at top of the website.

Tidelines Editors

(Image credit:  whyy.org)

King Tides in the Charleston Area August 10-13

King Tide is a non-scientific term used to describe high tides that are higher than normal. They usually occur during a full or new moon or during specific seasons throughout the year. They can cause flooding of low-lying areas resulting in road closures that may disrupt normal daily routines. This is particularly true when a king tide coincides with significant precipitation.

The 2022 predicted king tides are:

  •  August 10-13 
  • September 7-10 
  • October 26-28 
  • November 23-26 
  • December 23-25  

Remember to clear debris blocking the drains near your home before predicted king tides and if your home is prone to flooding, you might want to prepare your ground level for flooding.

SCDOT warns: Please use caution in areas that are impacted by flooding. It takes just 12 inches of water to carry away most cars and just 2 feet of rushing water can carry away SUVs and trucks. Never drive around barricades. Turn around, don’t drown.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is leading the South Carolina King Tides Initiative to document the effect that extreme tide events have on our state’s beaches, coastal waterways, private property, and public infrastructure. For more information on king tides and the Initiative, click here.

Tidelines Editors

Midsummer Hurricane Preparedness Checklist 2022

Early September is peak hurricane season, so now is the time to complete any unfinished projects from the Early Summer Hurricane Preparedness Checklist and to move on to these important actions.

  • Prepare for any medical needs:
    • Click here for suggestions about planning for medication, medical equipment, and medical care needs.
  • Prepare for your pets’ needs:
    • Click here for more information.
  • Talk to your neighbors about your needs and theirs regarding preparing ahead for the storm and in the event of a major disaster. Consider exchanging keys. Click here for more information. 
  • Identify evacuation needs and options:
    • Will you need a handicapped room?
    • Will you need electric vehicle charging facilities?
    • Do you need a pet-friendly hotel?
  • Prepare your home and yard:
    • Use the August and September Brown and White Days to dispose of unwanted yard and garage items.
    • Recheck property readiness for a storm. Click here for information about getting your property secure. Click here to learn how to prepare your propane tank.
    • Clean out gutters and downspouts to prevent flooding and pressure on awnings.
  • Obtain Emergency Preparedness Brochures. Click here for links to several options.

Remember, be prepared; stay safe.

Our Hurricane Hints can be accessed at any time on the Tidelines website. Use the Hurricane Hints dropdown menu.

Tidelines Editors

King Tides in the Charleston Area July 12-15

A King Tide is a non-scientific term used to describe high tides that are higher than normal. They usually occur during a full or new moon or during specific seasons throughout the year. They can cause flooding of low-lying areas resulting in road closures that may disrupt normal daily routines. This is particularly true when a king tide coincides with significant precipitation.

The 2022 predicted king tides are:

  • July 12-15 
  • August 10-13 
  • September 7-10 
  • October 26-28 
  • November 23-26 
  • December 23-25  

Remember to clear debris blocking the drains near your home before predicted king tides and if your home is prone to flooding, you might want to prepare your ground level for flooding.

SCDOT warns: Please use caution in areas that are impacted by flooding. It takes just 12 inches of water to carry away most cars and just 2 feet of rushing water can carry away SUVs and trucks. Never drive around barricades. Turn around, don’t drown.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is leading the South Carolina King Tides Initiative to document the effect that extreme tide events have on our state’s beaches, coastal waterways, private property, and public infrastructure. For more information on king tides and the Initiative, click here.

Tidelines Editors

How Homeowners Can Help Mitigate Flooding

The Seabrook Island Property Owners Association and the Club are responsible for maintaining and upgrading the island’s stormwater management system. However, property owners can also help mitigate the effects of flooding from storms and king tides.

Nature plays an important role in mitigating floods. When water from heavy rainstorms or king tides runs rapidly onto our roads, it can temporarily overload the stormwater drainage system and cause flooding that may restrict vehicle traffic. But by maintaining natural areas on our properties, we can slow runoff. There are nature-based solutions that lessen the rate of runoff and allow more of the water to soak into the ground while also allowing the remaining surface water to drain gradually after the storm or high tide has passed.

Some properties may be suitable for establishing a rain garden in low areas. A rain garden is a shallow basin made up of native perennials, shrubs, and flowers that collects and absorbs runoff. In addition to providing a level of flood mitigation, a rain garden can be aesthetically attractive and benefits our wildlife.

Natural woodlands have more water-absorbing capacity than lawns, so it helps to maintain as many native trees and shrubs, and as much natural ground cover as possible. Tree roots improve soil porosity and also soak up water, some of which then evaporates from the leaves. This process, called transpiration, continues to reduce stormwater stored in the soil long after a rainfall event ends. An additional benefit is the cooling effect of the tree canopy. 

Seabrook’s extensive wetlands play an important role as buffers and sponges to reduce flooding. Owners of marsh front properties can help maintain the quality of our wetlands by protecting the natural vegetation along the marsh edge.

Permeable surfaces improve infiltration and slow runoff. SIPOA limits the number of impervious surfaces permitted on a property. However, homeowners can use additional porous materials such as pervious concrete, interlocking pavers, or gravel for driveways to further slow runoff.

Before beginning any alterations on their property, homeowners should be sure they are in compliance with SIPOA policies and procedures.

For information about Seabrook Island Green Space Conservancy, click here.

-Submitted by Dick Wildermann, Seabrook Island Green Space Conservancy

(Image credit: Dick Wildermann at Montagu-Pollock residence)

2022 Disaster Awareness Day Recap

On Friday, June 17, 2022, The Town of Kiawah Island hosted this year’s Joint Disaster Awareness Day event with the Town of Seabrook Island.

With many residents in attendance, both communities (Kiawah and Seabrook Island) gathered to discuss everything related to storm preparation, emergency communications, and evacuation; each topic had a dedicated panel of experts to help guide the conversations and answer questions from the community.

Additionally, The Town was pleased to have Trooper Bob (Bob Beres) serving as the event’s moderator and mc.

Kiawah and Seabrook would like to thank all who were in attendance and are looking forward to the 2023’s event.

For individuals unable to attend, click here to watch the 2022 Disaster Awareness Day Event recap.

-Submitted by The Town of Kiawah Island

(Image credit: The Town of Kiawah Island)

Early Summer Hurricane Preparedness Checklist 2022

Hurricane season began on June 1 and runs through November 30. Before we even receive warnings that a hurricane is imminent, now is the time to prepare.

  • Prepare your home and yard: 
    • Clean out the ground floor. For suggestions, click here.
    • Inspect and secure your property. Click here for details.
    • Obtain sandbags. Click here for locations.
    • Fill propane tank and have it inspected for hurricane readiness. Click here for details. 
  • Gather and protect important documents. Click here for ideas.
  • Protect your treasures: 
    • Pack up stored items into plastic containers with secure lids.
    • Consider digitalizing photos and family videotapes.
    • Move documents and rarely worn jewelry to safe deposit box.
    • Back up computer photos and files to the cloud or external hard drive. 
  • Prepare for possible insurance claim: 
    • Take a video of the contents of your home with your cell phone.
    • Check coverage levels with regard to any renovations or new acquisitions.
    • Gather receipts and model and serial numbers of high-priced items. 
  • Buy storm supplies. Click here for suggestions.
  • Make sure your pets’ shots are current and microchip data is up to date.

Our Hurricane Hints can be accessed at any time on the Tidelines website. Use the Hurricane Hints dropdown menu.

Remember, be prepared, stay safe.

Tidelines Editors

Reminder: Disaster Awareness Day June 17

The Town of Kiawah and Seabrook Island will be hosting this year’s Disaster Awareness Day on Friday, June 17, 2022, at the Turtle Point Clubhouse, 1 Turtle Point Lane, Kiawah Island. The event will run from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm and will be followed by a complimentary lunch.

This program will focus on hurricane preparedness covering Storm Preparation, Emergency Communications, and Evacuation. Valuable prizes will be raffled off throughout the event! A complimentary lunch will follow the presentations. No RSVP is required. To gain access through the Kiawah gate, tell the guard that you are going to Disaster Awareness Day at Turtle Point.

Don’t miss an opportunity to get a crash course in hurricane preparedness and learn how our community will handle a hurricane scenario.  It’s also a great opportunity for residents to speak to our emergency management officials and various exhibitors.

Click here to see the 2022 Disaster Awareness Brochure.

Tidelines Editors

King Tides in the Charleston Area June 13-16

A King Tide is a non-scientific term used to describe high tides that are higher than normal. They usually occur during a full or new moon or during specific seasons throughout the year. They can cause flooding of low-lying areas resulting in road closures that may disrupt normal daily routines. This is particularly true when a king tide coincides with significant precipitation.

The 2022 predicted king tides are:

  • June 13-16 
  • July 12-15 
  • August 10-13 
  • September 7-10 
  • October 26-28 
  • November 23-26 
  • December 23-25  

Remember to clear debris blocking the drains near your home before predicted king tides and if your home is prone to flooding, you might want to prepare your ground level for flooding.

SCDOT warns: Please use caution in areas that are impacted by flooding. It takes just 12 inches of water to carry away most cars and just 2 feet of rushing water can carry away SUVs and trucks. Never drive around barricades. Turn around, don’t drown.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is leading the South Carolina King Tides Initiative to document the effect that extreme tide events have on our state’s beaches, coastal waterways, private property, and public infrastructure. For more information on king tides and the Initiative, click here.

Tidelines Editors