Ever wonder?

The Turtle Patrol reports that many people have questions about the turtles who come to nest on our beaches. Here are a few of them. Try your hand at the answers.

Questions:

Q1:  What is the annual nesting period in South Carolina?

Q2:  How many nests does an average mama turtle lay per year?

Q3:  What is the average number of eggs per nest?

Q4:  What is the average interval between nesting seasons for an individual turtle?

Q5:  What is the average gestation period for a nest?

Q6:  What is the average survivor rate (eggs laid to adult)?

Q7:  What is average survivor rate (hatchling to adult)?

Q8:  Where do the hatchlings travel after they go into the water?

Answers:

A1:  The annual nesting period in South Carolina is from May to August.

A2:   The average mama turtle lays eggs 4 to 7 times in a season.

A3. The average number of eggs per nest is 120.

A4:  An individual turtle lays eggs every 2 to 3 years.

A5:  The average gestation period for a nest is 45 to 75 days.

A6: The average survivor rate of eggs laid to adult turtles is 1 in 10,000.

A7:  The average survivor rate of hatchling to adult turtle is 1 in 1,000.

A8:  They travel to the Gulf Stream and then to the Sargasso Sea in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.  From there they travel via the ocean currents to the Alboran Sea (it is in the western most part of the Mediteranean Sea.)  There they live in a large “juvenile nursery” until they are teens.  The whole journey takes about one year.

If you have a question that you wonder about, send it along to seabrookislandblog@gmail.com and you may find your answer here.

Tidelines Editor

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